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20131202
20131210
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that mr. mandela brought about in south africa. my visit with him in '96, i had the privilege of spending nearly an hour with him in his office in south africa. the thing that struck me the most about mr. mandela, when you are in the presence of someone viewed by his countrymen as george washington, abraham lincoln and martin luther king it's intimidating. the thing that struck me is how open and engaging and humorous he was. we had a great time talking and laughing. i said to myself, an icon should not be this happy and laughing. you know, i expected a stone figure and i found a very -- >> doctor, can you reflect on how nelson mandela impacted those that you managed during your tenure at universities like howard? >> caller: sure. i was president of howard for 13 years. during that time, prior to my becoming president, mr. mandela received an honorary degree from howard. it was the first honorary degree he received from an american university. we are proud of that. mr. mandela, when i visited with him reminded me of his visit to washington and howard. he asked a question whether or not th
courage changed the world. mr. mandela went from freedom fighter to political prisoner to president. >> his message of reconciliat n reconciliation, not vengeance, inspired people everywhere after he negotiated a peaceful end to the brutal segregation of black south africans and forgiveness for what the white government had done, oppressed them and imprisoned him. today, the world is remembering ali con. >> nelson mandela. nelson mandela. ♪ >> in south africa, the grieving and mourning are mixed with songs and celebration. for the man affectionately known by his clan name madibmadiba. remembering the life and legacy of any son mandela. i'm suzanne malveaux. >> i'm michael holmes. thanks for your company. it is interesting how much of a celebration it has been. there is the mourning. there were tears tonight. today it's been singing and dancing, people celebrating the life. >> he seems to have an impact on just about everyone. people around the world are reacting. we are watching live pictures of him being celebrated in the streets of johannesburg. died in the suburbs of johannesb
of the congressional black caucus and other circles as they have been noting tonight, lots of concerts in support of mr. mandela, lots of concerts in support of those who said that we should not have any dealings with south africa as long as apartheid was still in place. >> the people for sanctions were on the right side of history because it really did weaken the regime and probably brought them to the bargaining table much quicker. >> in your article, you noted south africa's economic and clinical aspects were intertwined. how so? how did he help to narrow that defined? had growth rates under 1% during the entire apartheid regime. from the time he was a like did until 2008 they were clipping along. that is an astonishing miracle and away. he did that by saying we want free markets. we will not nationalize the minds. we want everyone to be able to sort of compete in our economic system and to take heart. and theyted jobs opened up the labor force. they had a very strong affirmative action program which has worked very well there. they managed to get a lot of people. >> let's talk a little bit about hi
are one of the most humble person i ever met. i will tell you whether mr. mandela arrived today he said to our producer and said what is the subject of today's show? [ applause ] and she said nelson mandela. you are the subject of today's show. and he goes, oh, all right. >> she credits mandela as the inspiration for her school for girls in south africa. our coverage of nelson mandela's life and death continues later this half hour as we hear from mandela's jailer who describes their unusual and long-lasting friendship. you want to keep it here on abc news all morning long. >>> all right. we will turn to other major headlines beginning with something of a reversal by the white house involving the president's uncle who had been facing deportation from the u.s. omar and the president had never met but they said he lived with him three weeks while attending law school. it came after the judge ruled he could stay ignoring a deportationing order two decades ago. >>> libyan government says so far no one claimed responsibility for shooting an american teacher to death as he jogged through the
. >>> and president barak obama paid his respects tog during a televised event. he credits mr. mandela with his first political action company against apartheid. this is some of what mr. obama had to say. >> we will not likely see the likes of nelson mandela again. so it falls to us as best we can to forward the dpl that he set to make decisions guided not by hate but by love. never discount the difference that one person can make to strive for a further worthy of his sacrifice. >> well, one of nelson mandela's biggest supporters was archbishop desmond tutu. he presided over a church service in capetown to remember his friend a short time ago. these pictures coming into us about 30 minutes ago and people listening to mr. tutu's every word about his friend. archbishop tutu also released a statement saying, we quote, over the past 24 hour years madiba taught us how to come together and to believe in ourselves and each other. he was a unifier from the moment he walked out of prison. we are relieved that his suffering is over, but our relief is drowned by our grief. may he rest in peace and rise in glory
us the background of that photo. >> mr. mandela came to the understand to attend the clinton inaugural. he was very close for the clinton family. in fact the clintons visited the mandelas early this year and last year, and when secretary of state clinton visited south africa before she left office, but he wanted to participate. he wanted to know more about how we ran campaigns here. he wanted to be part of the celebration, because he had a great deal of respect. and i was with my friend yolanda caraway to escort him to the inaugural ball. he wanted to see the city. >> former president clinton -- tweeted i'll never forget my friend madeiba, and you can see the love there. david cameron, the prime minister of britain is now speaking. i think we're going to try to fix that audio. once we do, we'll hear david cameron, the british prime minister. he's paying his respects over in london right now once we've fixed that technical problem, we'll hear what he has to say. he's paying his respects. i want to show our viewers some video. february 11th, 1990. right now a very, very special
that mr nelson mandela visited atlan atlan atlanda -- atlant ageorgia and paid his respects. robert ray is at the historic site. >> we have a special privilege, al jazeera america does to be at the king site at downtown atlanta where martin luther king and his wife are buried behind me. june 27th, 1990, nelson mandela at the tail end of his american tour stopped here in atlanta. some of the first things he said when he got off the plane is it reminded him because of his home town of south africa, because of the landscape and warmth. it was a hot day. it was a whirl wind tour around the state of georgia, as he was escorted in a bulletproof limousine and brought out at three locations, morehouse college being one, where he was made an honorary morehouse man. after that, as you can see, the cameraman can zoom in, he was brought to this site where martin luther king is buried. nelson mandela lay a wreath. he was with his wife. he was put back into his limousine, stepped into the camera and brought to georgia tech's football stadium where 50,000 plus were in the stands waiting for him. one o
government, under increasing pressure and isolated in the world, suddenly yielded. >> mr. nelson mandela will be released at the staff prison. >> reporter: it was an amazing moment when mandela walked out of prison. on february 11th, 1990. the world rejoiced. he worked with his former enemy to move toward free elections and the end of apartheid. he and frederik willem de klerk were jointly awarded the nobel peace prize in 1993 and the following year this, the world again looked on in wonder and joy as millions of black south africans lined up to vote for the first time. nelson mandela was elected president in a landslide. >> so help me god. >> reporter: a few months later at his inauguration attended by scores of world leaders, he declared a new era for his beloved country. >> never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another. >> reporter: terry moran, abc news. >> now what happens next is nelson mandela's body has already been moved to the hospital. he will be given a state funeral. not only that, but all of the flags will be at half
when he came in 1990 it was a big part of the visit. it said welcome home mr and mrs nelson mandela. one of the people who remembered that was the historian, mr billy mitchell. we talked about what that day was like in his memory. >> he was fully aware that all the people from civil rights fighters and to have his preps here, it meant a lot to all of us coming up out of problems. we were going through housing, education, things that of nature. his presence made us feel good, that there is hope. if this man could spend it that much time in prison and never gave in, so, of course, that would be reflected in the community that he was visiting. we were so positive by him being here, that there's nothing we can't do. >> tonight we have seen a lot of people stopping buy to share stories along each other. a few gathering under the apollo marquee. people have brought pictures by. a lot of pictures sharing memories of that day. so many people came by to see him. >> thank you very much. we are doing to take a break, but we'll look at nelson mandela's fight against apartheid coming up. convers
of the most humble people i've ever met. and mr. mandela arrived today, he said to the producer, said to him, what is the subject of today's show? [laughter] [applause] >> if anybody ever earned that our on oprah winfrey, it was nelson mandela. in closing this special report, bill, you worked so many years in the johannes berg -- in the johannesburg bureau. your thoughts on the passing of nelson mandela? >> everybody acknowledges he is an icon and simple and all of that. i think what people tend to overlook and what in my mind made him exceptional among the thering figures of 21st century is he was such an astute politician. you look back over the whole trajectory of his life, he was at one time a lack nationalists, then a non-racialist, he opposed arm struggles, then took up arms struggles, then he dropped arm struggles. he was close partner of the ,outh african communist party and for a year or two was actually member of the communist party, yet as a president he was a close ally of south africa's capitalists. in other words, he was whatever served his purpose. he never lost sight of the b
through mr. mandela's mind at this moment. >> reporter: after 27 years in prison nelson mandela walked into freedom, against all odds the leader of rebellion against south africa's white apartheid government became the leader of national unity. mandela's decades long rebellion transformed him from a convicted trader into a freedom fighter and international hero. >> i have fought very firmly against apartheid on the nation. >> reporter: mandela was born into approved family. he support -- into a privileged family. he supported nonviolence to bring about change. he became a lawyer and opened the first south african law firm to defend blacks who were forced from their land, but in 1960 mandela turned militant when 69 black protesters were massacred. >> many use fear, but it is useless and futile for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence. >> reporter: mandela lived up to his tribal name troublemaker repeatedly challenging authority. he was convicted of sabotage and conspiracy to overthrow the government and sentenced to life in prison on south africa's infamous robin island. he wa
of mr. mandela's health. remind the viewers of what president obama did when he went to south africa several months ago? >> well, again, i wasn't on that trip, but there was oncern, some talk even then. nelson mandela was in failing health at that time. that perhaps his visit to south africa could coincide with nelson mandela, his illness. he didn't go visit directly with nelson mandela at the time. their two lives, given their places in history, have intersected somewhat. we are waiting to hear what president obama says about nelson man tele. would not be surprised to have him appear on camera to discuss his legacy not only in south africa, but in the united states. there is a new movie out now about nelson mandela and his journey from an activist at the african national congress, to his imprisonment, his release and his rise to lead south africa, the incredible rise to lead south africa. no word exactly on what the president can say or when real hear something from president obama. i would think it would be in the not too distance future. not long ago the president himself was in a
. >> the official mourning of nelson mandela has begun. president obama and mrs. obama will attend the furniture on tuesday. it's part of a series of events planned to honour the leader. >> i'm john henry smith, we'll look on a championship saturday in college football. the day that stood up for d.c. s. >> al jazeera continues in 2.5 minutes. i'm morgan radford. i'll be back with all the top stories. >> troops on the ground. hundreds of french troops sent to the central african republic trying to restore order. anti-government protesters in the ukraine call for a million-man march trying to get rid of the government. in a day of mourning nelson mandela's ex-wife attended a church service to pay tribe ute to a government. gold snap across the city - smart lander at a stand still. freezing rain and heavy snow - cold snap. >> good morning, welcome to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford, live in new york city. the french president issued a veiled warning to the president of the central african republic, francis hollande saying it will be tough to keep him in place given the violence or the ground
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13

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